Gcse chemistry coursework experiments


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Disappearing X Experiment. Coursework About Sodium

You've had your free 15 questions for today. Interested in playing more? You'll need to subscribe. To comply with the new e-Privacy directive, we need to ask for your consent - I agree - No thanks - Find out more. Join Us Login. If results do not support the prediction, it means that the prediction was wrong. Unit 4 - Draw a Conclusion When your experiment is finished, it is time to process the results and draw a conclusion. It should be linked to the original aim of the experimental work. Conclusions are based on which of the following?

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Conclusions are always based on the results of the experiment. We refer to this in the conclusion, and state whether the results agree. Making predictions and then testing them to see if they are correct is called the scientific method. It works very well outside of science and can help you to avoid jumping to the wrong conclusion in many different situations in your life! What is the conclusion for the following data?


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As the temperature increased, the volume of gas decreased. As the volume of gas increased the temperature decreased.


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  • GCSE Draw a Conclusion | Revise Analysing Experiment Results.
  • As the temperature increased, the volume of gas remained the same. As the temperature increased, the volume of gas increased. Always relate the two variables in the conclusion. Conclusions are positioned It is the logical place as a conclusion sums up what you have discovered from your investigation. Which of the following is the correct order for writing up an experiment? Prediction - method - results - conclusion.

    Conclusion - method - results - prediction. Results - prediction - method - conclusion. Prediction - method - conclusion - results. If the results double every time the key variable is doubled, the conclusion will say the results are in In investigations that have generated a set of figures in the results, always try to put a number on any correlation.

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    It is not always obvious or possible though, so don't worry too much if you can't do this. Results which disagree with the prediction are described as Always include a statement in the conclusion about whether the results support the prediction or not.

    If results do not support the prediction, it means that Briefly explain how the method can be used to measure the speed - the results of the first few minutes is usually the most crucial - you can discuss briefly other methods, but perhaps better in evaluation as a means of further evidence. When you have decided on the method, give a detailed description of how you might carry it out.

    Clearly indicate why the method would be expected to produce precise and reliable evidence - the results! Include 'health and safety' points. If you are looking at changing the reaction temperature, its not easy to accurately vary and control the temperature of the reactants without a thermostated water bath to hold the reaction flask in.

    Even with a thermostated water bath normally only available to advanced level students , all the reactant solutions should be pre-warmed in the bath before mixing and start the timing and recoding of results. If you are varying temperature, you need to heat up the reactant solutions separately and take their temperatures, mix, start stopwatch. However, they will cool a little standing out in the laboratory, so not completely satisfactory solution to the problem. In the case of the sodium thiosulphate - acid reaction, you can leave the thermometer in the flask and take the temperature at the end, then use an average for the temperature of the reaction.

    If temperature isn't a variable, it must be kept constant. The simplest solution here, is to make sure all the chemicals have been standing in the laboratory prior to the lesson. Then, they will all be at the same temperature, which should be recorded. If more experiments are conducted at another the time, the temperature must again be checked and recorded. Refer to any previous laboratory experience with 'rate of reaction' experiments which may have helped you decide and design the experimental method. These must be clearly recorded in neat tables showing all the units e.

    The results are initially processed into graphical form 'graphing' for several reasons for both the analysis and evaluating the experimental Use smooth 'best curves' for as many of the points as possible, though some parts of the graph might be linear, watch out for the 'scatter' - the experiment is not that easy to get good results.

    See Rates of Reaction Notes. From the graph you can then describe in words what the results mean, always refer to the graph lines and gradients directly - don't make vague comments. So what we are after is the main 'trend s ' or 'pattern s ' describing with reference to the graphs. Does the 'trend' of all the graph lines support you're your prediction, are all the results consistent with your prediction AND theory?

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    For different the acid concentrations you can do a 2 nd and more advanced graphical analysis of the limestone results. This involves measuring from the graph, the speed of the reaction at the start. Explain why best data at the start? What graph could you then plot? We are basically talking about plotting the initial rate versus e. From this graph re-discuss your findings in a more mathematical way and relate this to the particle collision theory of reactions!

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